About Kristin Stork, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Denver7

Kristin Stork, Director of Strategic Partnerships at Denver 7
Kristin Stork, Director of Strategic Partnerships

I’ve worked in corporate philanthropy/community affairs for 14 years. Served as director of community relations for Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck law firm and manager of community relations and charities for The Denver Post. I’ve spent nearly all my career working with and/or for nonprofit organizations including marketing and public relations roles with the Children’s Museum of Denver and the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities. I realized early in my career that it is important to me to do work that makes a difference.I’m proud to serve on the boards of Hunger Free Colorado and The Denver Post Community Foundation. I also serve on the direct services grantmaking committee for the Women’s Foundation of ColoradoI am excited to return to the world of media and am proud to be part of the team at Denver7. The station and its people authentically care about this community, and I’m proud to help develop and lead our efforts in this arena.


Talk about Denver7’s community commitment

  • Denver7 helps Coloradans navigate challenges and celebrate life in this state we all love, so they can make the best decisions for themselves and their families.
  • Denver7 cares about this community – our community. We live here, work here and tell the stories that impact this community. It’s important to us that we have an authentic connection to it.
  • Literacy is a big area of focus for us, as we know that reading is a crucial contributing factor to success in school and in life. Through our Read to Lead program, we work to help people of all ages learn to read and read more often.
  • Visit www.TheDenverChannel.com/Community to learn more.


Why does a partnership with CWHF appeal to you and Denver7?

  • We love to tell stories about amazing people in our state, and this partnership provides us with the opportunity to recognize and tell the stories of some incredible Colorado women.


What are your thoughts about the importance of mentors and role models?  How do you perceive that CWHF fulfills some of that?

  • Hearing the stories of successful women from all walks of life can play a crucial role in the lives of young women. The women honored by CWHF serve as role models to girls across the state – showing them a wide variety of ways they can make a difference and succeed.
  • We don’t know what we don’t know. Role models and mentors help us to learn what we don’t know. Through their experiences, our minds and worlds can be opened to new possibilities and opportunities. For young women, when they see someone who looks like them or comes from their neighborhood doing something they never would have thought to do, the impossible becomes possible.


How do we, together, put “her” back into history?

  • For me, it’s all about storytelling, and CWHF gives us such a fantastic opportunity to do that. To share the stories of great women in our state. To remember the history and to inspire the future.

Who is Your Hero?

By Anne Trujillo, Anchor, Denver7

Anne Trujillo Denver7

It’s a simple question that gets complicated when you think how easily and quickly that word hero is thrown around. The answer for me wasn’t hard. My friend Sherri Vasquez is one of my heroes. My lovely friend just passed away April 25th, she was just 56 years old. Gone much too soon. We didn’t shop together, meet up for lunch or do girl things together. We were fellow journalists who had a mutual respect for one another. Sherri and I both earned our Journalism degrees from the University of Colorado. She went to the print side; I worked the broadcast side. She worked at the Rocky Mountain News; I worked at Denver7. Our paths crossed because we were both members of the Colorado Hispanic Media Association. There were very few Latinos working in the news media in the 80’s and 90’s, and CHMA provided some professional support in an era when it took work to get women hired into newsrooms; it took thick skin to stay there.

During her time at the Rocky, Sherri won the Positive Images Award two years in a row from the CHMA because she was fearless in delivering news about her community. 

She wrote a weekly column in the Rocky called “Que Pasa” because she was determined to tell the stories about a community no one else was writing about, featuring the characters, the people, the culture and events that weren’t being covered in mainstream media. That was a risky move for a local newspaper and not a popular path to take. Sherri was a trailblazer who wasn’t afraid of backlash because she knew what she was doing was meaningful and important. As readers, we needed those articles to remind ourselves that our history is important too. In a time when news organizations were more likely to interview officials and specialists about issues in our minority communities, Sherri was raising the bar and showcasing the very people most directly impacted. She wanted people, especially young people to know we don’t all think alike and don’t all fit under one heading. We may call ourselves Latino or Hispanic, but if you delve deeper we all identify in a more meaningful way as Chicanos, Spanish, Mexicans, New Mexicans, Hondurans, Puerto Ricans and so on.  We are not the same and Sherri wanted her readers to know it too. In our community, there are Latinos who are doctors, entrepreneurs, lawyers and professionals but for a long time no one wrote about them or interviewed them, except for Sherri. 

According to the Society of Professional Journalists, we believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy.

Journalism doesn’t always have to be about politics, or crime or business. It is a marker of our history, the archives of our lives. Sherri Vasquez made sure we knew our history so we could learn from the past and help build a better future. And that is the kind of public enlightenment we all deserve.

It’s a simple question that gets complicated when you think how easily and quickly that word hero is thrown around. The answer for me wasn’t hard. My friend Sherri Vasquez is one of my heroes. My lovely friend just passed away April 25th, she was just 56 years old. Gone much too soon. We didn’t shop together, meet up for lunch or do girl things together. We were fellow journalists who had a mutual respect for one another. Sherri and I both earned our Journalism degrees from the University of Colorado. She went to the print side; I worked the broadcast side. She worked at the Rocky Mountain News; I worked at Denver7. Our paths crossed because we were both members of the Colorado Hispanic Media Association. There were very few Latinos working in the news media in the 80’s and 90’s, and CHMA provided some professional support in an era when it took work to get women hired into newsrooms; it took thick skin to stay there.

During her time at the Rocky, Sherri won the Positive Images Award two years in a row from the CHMA because she was fearless in delivering news about her community. 

She wrote a weekly column in the Rocky called “Que Pasa” because she was determined to tell the stories about a community no one else was writing about, featuring the characters, the people, the culture and events that weren’t being covered in mainstream media. That was a risky move for a local newspaper and not a popular path to take. Sherri was a trailblazer who wasn’t afraid of backlash because she knew what she was doing was meaningful and important. As readers, we needed those articles to remind ourselves that our history is important too. In a time when news organizations were more likely to interview officials and specialists about issues in our minority communities, Sherri was raising the bar and showcasing the very people most directly impacted. She wanted people, especially young people to know we don’t all think alike and don’t all fit under one heading. We may call ourselves Latino or Hispanic, but if you delve deeper we all identify in a more meaningful way as Chicanos, Spanish, Mexicans, New Mexicans, Hondurans, Puerto Ricans and so on.  We are not the same and Sherri wanted her readers to know it too. In our community, there are Latinos who are doctors, entrepreneurs, lawyers and professionals but for a long time no one wrote about them or interviewed them, except for Sherri. 

According to the Society of Professional Journalists, we believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy.

Journalism doesn’t always have to be about politics, or crime or business. It is a marker of our history, the archives of our lives. Sherri Vasquez made sure we knew our history so we could learn from the past and help build a better future. And that is the kind of public enlightenment we all deserve.

Media Partner Spotlight: Pauline Rivera

MEET PAULINE RIVERA, Publisher, LaVoz

Pauline Rivera is a graduate of Metropolitan State University of Denver where she majored in Journalism with a minor in History

Pauline Rivera

In 2004 Pauline joined La Voz on a contract basis, then as a columnist (Mis Recuerdos), eventually becoming the Lifestyles editor. In 2007 she became the General Manager at La Voz. In 2008 Pauline and her husband purchased La Voz and have successfully operated the 45-year-old bilingual publication. Under her leadership, as Publisher, La Voz has advanced editorially, has expanded statewide, and is the winner of numerous National Association of Hispanic Publicans (NAHP) awards for the past seven years. Pauline has recently been awarded the Trailblazer Award from the Denver Latinas First Foundation for being the “first” Latina publisher of a Hispanic publication in Denver.  Under her leadership La Voz was granted a face-to-face EXCLUSIVE interview with President Barack Obama in 2012. Also, in addition to Denver and its surrounding communities, and northern Colorado, La Voz has expanded their reach to both Pueblo and Colorado Springs, major Colorado cities with large Latino populations.

Tell us something special about you that we don’t already know…

I was the first Latina to own a bilingual publication. Also named Latina Publisher of the year 2016 by the National Association of Hispanic Publications (NAHP)

Why does a partnership with CWHF appeal to you and La Voz?

It is important that CWHF highlight the very same women represented in today’s society and continue instilling diversity.

What are your thoughts about the importance of mentors and role models?

Role models and mentors are important because it is easier to success with someone’s help and experience than doing it alone. CWHF continues to seek ways to reach all groups.

How do you feel about the progress women have made in the business world, as community citizens, as voices for progress?

Women are dominating the workforce and Latinas in general account for more than 25 percent of new businesses.

How do we, together, put “her” back into history?

We work together by working to represent what society looks like today, diverse and inclusive.

What makes you hopeful and happy?

That more women are stepping up and taking control of their skills, know how and integrity is key.

What words of inspiration might you have for CWHF and the future generation of women? Integrity is the key to success; diversity is the key to fairness and equality.